Dec. 7, 2020

Three Things You Must Have In Your Band Bio | Outerloop Coaching Hosts

Three Things You Must Have In Your Band Bio | Outerloop Coaching Hosts

Outerloop Coaching Hosts


Your Band Bio is How You Introduce Yourself to the World To make a great first impression, make sure your Band Bio includes these three things In your EPK, there are a number of important elements. Your photo, your video... These are obviously crucial elements to introducing yourself to the world. But your band bio could be the most important. And so many bands, frankly, SCREW IT UP. Visit http://www.outerloopcoaching.com to download the Music Management Primer for free today! Please like and comment below! Thank you for subscribing to Outerloop Coaching and Outerloop Records. Hit the bell to get alerts when a new video is released! More on this topic and many others can be found at http://www.outerloopcoaching.com My two part series on the Elements of a Great EPK (mentioned near the end of the video) can be found here: http://outerloop.group/how-to-make-a-good-epk-part-1 and here: http://outerloop.group/how-to-make-a-good-epk-part-2 I'll write next week about three things your band bio should NOT have but wanted to write this week about three things it SHOULD. First, your band bio needs a story. Your story is how potential fans and media will connect and be intrigued by your band before they have heard a note of your music. Your story is what interviewers are going to ask you about and want to know more about. It's what makes YOU interesting. Here's an example of a great story IN ONLY SIX WORDS: Baby shoes. For sale. Never worn. These six words, extremely quickly, paint the outlines of a picture the imagination can't wait to fill in. Can you write a story for your band in only six words? How about fifteen? Write a compelling story for your band in less than twenty words and NOW you have the start of a great band bio. Second, you need a compelling description of your music. Now, the LAZY way to write a compelling description of your music is to describe it as "this band" meets "that band". YAWN. But this style IS effective in being compelling in that it references things people are familiar with and piques curiosity as to what that description might sound like. Be boring if you HAVE to, but it's better to be creative and come up with a better way to use familiar references to describe your music. Try it out with friends. "I heard this song. It sounds like <insert compelling description here>." If they can't wait to hear... YOU... based on your description, your description IS compelling and works. Third, and this is my favorite, you need to launch above the line of super-credibility. This isn't my idea. This is a concept from startup guru Peter Diamandis. The idea is to make sure, while making your first impression, to associate yourself with people and brands (and brands) the reader will be familiar with and you want to be associated with. Think about it. If you got dragged out to an opera and the venue was a bowling alley, you might have a different impression as to what that opera is GOING to be when you were initially proposed the idea. This is because you associated the opera with ONE idea in your head initially, but then when the venue turned out to be a bowling alley, you associate it with total different ideas. And your impression will sound and look different - BEFORE YOU HAVE HEARD A NOTE OF MUSIC. The same idea happens in your band bio. When you associate yourself with names, you want those associations to suggest something to the reader. Check out the video below for a few ideas how to do this effectively. Next week I'll talk about three things your band bio should NOT have. Don't miss it! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices